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Full text of "Keep tubercolosis out of your swine this preventable disease costs hog raisers millions of dollars annually ... : how to prevent this costly plague : get rid of tuberculous hogs, start with a clean herd"

Historic, archived document 



Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 




THIS PREVENTABLE DISEASE COSTS HOE RAISERS 

MILLIONS OF DOLLARS ANNUALLY 




INSPECTION AFTER SLAUGHTER SHOWED THAT ONE OUT OF FOUR OF THESE SEEMINGLY HEALTHY HOGS HAD TUBERCULOSIS. HOGS MAY APPEAR TO BE THRIFTY 

AND WELL AND YET HARBOR THE DISEASE. FOLLOW UP YOUR SLAUGHTERHOUSE RECORDS. 



Certain Packing Houses and Buyers are Beginning to Avoid Districts 
Where Tuberculosis is Common, or to Buy Hogs Subject to Post- 
mortem Examination, with any Loss Falling on the Producer 



HOW TO PREVENT THIS COSTLY PLAGUE 



Cook or Pasteurize All Milk or Milk 
Products Fed to Hogs 

Raw milk from a tuberculous cow will sooner or later cer- 
tainly carry the germs of tuberculosis to your hogs. A little 
care will prevent this. 




TUBERCLE BACILLI IN RAW MILK, BUTTERMILK, OR WHEY ARE PARTICU- 
LARLY DANGEROUS. TUBERCULOSIS STARTING IN A YOUNG PIG IS LIABLE 
TO BECOME SERIOUS AND GENERAL BEFORE THE ANIMAL IS READY FOR 
MARKET AND SEND THE HOG TO THE FERTILIZER TANK. 

Scald all skimmed milk, buttermilk, or whey. Even boil- 
ing will not lessen their feeding value. Either scalding, boil- 
ing, or pasteurizing — that is, heating to 145° F. and holding at 
that temperature for 30 minutes — will kill all germs of tuber- 
culosis and also render harmless stray germs of many other 
animal diseases. No farmer, unless his herd is tuberculin 
tested and free from tuberculosis, should feed his skimmed 
milk raw to his swine. He is taking an unnecessary risk of 
having them rejected at the slaughterhouse. 



Raw skimmed milk and buttermilk from 
creameries and whey from cheese factories are 
particularly dangerous. If there happens to be 
only one tuberculous herd on the creamery route, 
the skimmed milk from that farm may spread 
tubercle bacilli through all the milk in the 
skimmed -milk tank. Cook all raw milk taken 
home from the creamery. Better yet, join with 
your neighbors in insisting that the creamery 
shall pasteurize skimmed milk before it is deliv- 
ered. Such pasteurization prevents the cream- 
ery from becoming a distributing point for animal 
diseases, the germs of which get into milk. If 
your creamery delivers pasteurized skimmed 
milk, see that your own cans are sterilized before 
you take your share. The little raw milk left in 
your own cans may contaminate the pasteurized 
milk furnished by the creamery. 

Raw garbage, raw slaughterhouse offal, the 
raw flesh of dead chickens, or other carrion also 
are very liable to contain germs of tuberculosis 
that will infect your hogs. Cook all raw garbage 
or meat before you give it to your animals. 
Garbage so prepared is excellent food for hogs, 
provided it is not decomposed before it is cooked. 
Keep garbage containers clean, and construct 
piggeries where sterilized garbage is prepared 
and fed, so that they may be cleaned readily. 
Prepared tankage from slaughterhouses is free 
from danger, as its preparation involves thorough 
cooking or sterilization. 



Keep Hogs Away From Dairy Cows 
Not Tuberculin Tested 

The droppings of tuberculous cows, especially of those in 
which the disease is of long standing, are almost certain to 
contain large numbers of tubercle bacilli. 




IF ANY OF THESE COWS HAVE TUBERCULOSIS, THE HOGS FOLLOWING THEM 
AND ROOTING IN BEDDING AND DROPPINGS ARE CERTAIN TO GET THE 
DISEASE. 

Hogs having access to manure or bedding from such cows 
are almost certain to get the disease. The safest plan is to 
keep your hogs absolutely away from your dairy cattle unless 
your herd has been tuberculin tested and is known to be free 
from tuberculosis. The risk more than offsets any feeding 
advantage. 

In the case of steers or other cattle known as "feeders," it 
is comparatively safe to allow hogs to follow them, as the dis- 
ease is not very common among these animals, and they 
usually are sold off the farm before the disease, if contracted, 
develops to a point where their droppings would be infected. 



GET RID OF TUBERCULOUS H( 

Fortunately, hogs, with the exception of valuable breeding animals, are not kept for a num- 
ber of years on a farm. Most of them are sold each year. If your swine are tuberculous, as 
you can tell from slaughterhouse reports or by having them tuberculin tested, make a clean 
sweep of your herd. 

Sell all the hogs, including breeding animals, for what the healthy hogs will bring as meat 
and the infected hogs will bring as tankage or grease. 
If the sow is free from tuberculosis, the pigs start right. 



I— START WITH A CLEAN HERD 

Clean up and disinfect hog lots thoroughly and then get new breeding stock which tuberculin 
tests show are free from tuberculosis. 

When you have established a herd free from tuberculosis, do not introduce strange animals 
from other farms into your herd until you have satisfied yourself that they are free from disease. 

In a short time you will have a herd that is thriving and healthy and will attract buyers. 

Make it your business to follow up your hogs which go to the slaughterhouse, as the slaugh- 
terhouse report may give you the first warning that your swine are diseased. 




Send for Farmers' Bulletin No. 781, "Tuberculosis of Hogs." 

This Bulletin, which the Department of Agriculture will send free on application to any farmer, 
contains a complete discussion by expert veterinarians and pathologists of the nature and financial 
importance of this disease. It gives methods for detecting the disease and simple directions 
for preventing infection of herds and getting rid of the disease once it has gotten into your swine. 




U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

8—3699